Contents

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s One of the most daunting things when I first started looking for a gun was… what size bullet to get? Popular Pistol Calibers Things got even crazier when I started to look at rifles… Common Rifle Calibers But don’t worry…we’ll be covering some of the most popular handgun, rifle, and shotgun calibers out there. As well as the benefits and weaknesses of each. Then we’ll follow up with some bullet terminology and the different types of bullet tips (hollow point, etc), how shotgun shell sizes work, and a breakdown of the components of a round.

Bullets: Sizes, Calibers, and Types [Guide + Videos]

Bullets: Sizes, Calibers, and Types [Guide + Videos]Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s One of the most daunting things when I first started looking for a gun was… what size bullet to get? Popular Pistol Calibers Things got even crazier when I started to look at rifles… Common Rifle Calibers But don’t worry…we’ll be covering some of the most popular handgun, rifle, and shotgun calibers out there. As well as the benefits and weaknesses of each. Then we’ll follow up with some bullet terminology and the different types of bullet tips (hollow point, etc), how shotgun shell sizes work, and a breakdown of the components of a round. Different Bullet Tips (L TO R: FMJ, Soft, Open, Ballistic) By the end, you’ll be a bullet pro ! Table of Contents Loading... Bullet Size & Caliber First! For guns, “caliber” means the diameter of the barrel and thus the diameter of the bullet that is going through it.  Usually in inches or mm . Also for terminology’s sake, “bullet” just means the metal projectile, while the entire thing is called a cartridge. Parts of a Bullet Cartridge Here’s some common 9mm bullets. 9mm (115gr vs 124gr vs 147gr) If you want to jump ahead, check out our suggestion for the Best Place to "Buy Ammo Online" . Now what you’ve been waiting for… Rimfire vs Centerfire The first differentiator is between rimfire and centerfire cartridges. The rimfire’s primer is built into the rim while the centerfire cartridge has the primer in the center.  Pro tip…if you can see a circle in the middle…it’s a centerfire cartridge. Rimfire (First 2 on the Left) vs Centerfire Cartridges Rimfires are extremely cheap (few cents each) and the .22LR is the most popular rimfire caliber. .22LR (CCI vs Winchester vs Super Colibri) This animation shows how the firing pin hits the primer in a cartridge. Centerfire vs Rimfire Primer Here’s some expended casings from a rimfire vs centerfire. Rimfire vs Centerfire Primer Strike For even more differences, see our article on Rimfire Ammo or familiarize yourself with How Guns Work . Common Bullet Calibers To make things a little more confusing, there’s a mixture of measurements in inches and millimeters . There’s also a unit of weight called a “grain” which is used to denote the weight of bullets and gunpowder.  A “grain” is really small since 7000 grains make up one pound. 62gr XM855 vs 77gr SMK vs 55gr FMJ Now let’s go through some! More "Common Bullet Calibers" .22LR The “twenty-two” long-rifle is the most common caliber in terms of units sold. .22LR Round It has a bullet weight of around 30-40 grains and is extremely mild shooting in both pistols and rifles. The recoil is almost non-existent which makes it a great starter round for someone who has never shot a gun or is uncomfortable with the noise. The low price of the bullets is also great for learning sight pictures. It is traditionally the starting caliber for shooters.  These things are only a few steps up from a pellet gun round…especially in a rifle (Ruger 10/22) shown below. They can kill, don’t get me wrong, but they’re mostly for killing rats, snakes, and birds.  They’ll kill an attacker for sure but it might take a shot or six. For more info: Best .22 Long Rifle Ammo Best .22LR Pistols Best .22LR Rifles .380 ACP Now we’re getting into slightly beefier sizes. .380 ACP Round Personally, I would never use a gun with anything smaller than a .380 as my primary carry weapon. Sometimes called a “9mm Short”, it has seen a major boost in popularity recently thanks to the various “pocket pistols” that have come on the market. This bullet has relatively low recoil and, at close range, good penetration. Gun author Massad Ayoob once said of the .380 “Some experts will say it’s barely adequate, and others will say it’s barely inadequate.”  This is a low power round. Because of the nature of the bullet and the guns that shoot it, it’s going to be relatively useless beyond close-ish range. For more info: Best .380 ACP Ammo Best .380 Pocket Pistols 9mm 9mm Round (115gr) This pistol round is officially known as the “9x19mm Parabellum” or “9mm Luger” to distinguish it from other 9mm rounds, but you will be fine just saying “nine millimeter” or “nine mil” for those in the know. My personal favorite and if there was a “Goldilocks” round, this would be it. The very first gun I bought was a 9mm. They’re fun at the range.  They’re good for defense. Believe it or not…or actually believe it because it’s true…the 9mm bullet is the same diameter as the bullet used in the .380 and the .38 Special. The difference between the three is the amount of gunpowder behind it and possibly bullet weight. 9mm (115gr vs 124gr vs 147gr) It is the standard round for NATO countries and the majority of police forces around the world. It is mild shooting, can vary in weight from 115-147 grains, and has varying stopping power based on the type of bullet (hint, go with hollow points ). Ballistics Gel Testing Many, many guns use this size as well.  A compact 9mm gun can be used for concealed carry.  Most of the guns that use this size can hold on average 15-17 rounds in the magazine. 9mm 147 Federal Hydrashok HST, Our Favorite Self-Defense Round And now…there’s been a huge rise in popularity of Pistol Caliber Carbines (or PCC).  Get the nice ergonomics of a rifle but with the price and hollowpoints of the 9mm. For more info: Best 9mm Ammo Best 9mm Handguns Best "Pistol Caliber Carbines" .40 S&W .40 S&W Round Remember how I said the 9mm was the “Goldilocks Round”?  If that’s the case then the .40 is her big, angry, whiskey drinking sister. Originally designed for the FBI as a reduced 10mm cartridge and popular with other law enforcement agencies ever since.  More kick when compared to the other popular handgun cartridge, the 9mm.  Weights of the bullet can vary from 155 to 165 and 180 gr. Note that the FBI recently decided to move back to the 9mm since agents are able to shoot more quickly and more accurately with 9mm compared to the .40 S&W. For more info: Best .40 S&W Ammo .45 ACP .45 ACP (230gr) Designed in 1904 by Mr. John Browning himself for the famous 1911 pistol, this round has one heck of a history. Rock Island Armory 1911 GI Midsize This thing is a big bullet with stopping power to spare. The choice of many police officers and military personnel for years, the .45 caliber round has proven itself time and time again.  I could probably do an entire article on just this bullet. It has a large bullet of around 230 grains and has moderate recoil. 9mm vs .45 ACP I can tell you from personal experience that this is not a round to hand to someone who’s never fired a gun before.  Its stopping power is renowned and has a nostalgic following. For more info: Best .45 ACP Ammo Best .45 ACP Pistols That Are Not 1911s Best 1911s .38 Special & .357 Magnum The “thirty-eight special” is most commonly found in revolvers. .38 Special Round It has manageable recoil but is still quite a handful when in a very light/small revolver.  It has a longer cartridge and more powder in said cartridge but it is a slower, heavier bullet than the 9mm. The FBI used this cartridge as its standard issue for a very long time. The .357 Magnum is identical to the round except for being slightly longer. .38 Special vs .357 Magnum You can safely fire a .38 Special in a .357 Magnum gun, but don’t try the other way around due to size and pressure constraints. Bullet weights vary from 110 to 132 to 158 gr. .38 and .357 in the S&W 686+ For more info: Best .38 Special & .357 Magnum Ammo Best .38 Special Revolvers Best .357 Magnum Revolvers 7.62x39mm The Soviet round used in the AK-47 line of rifles. 7.62x39mm It has moderate recoil, great knockdown power, and a bullet weight of usually 123 grains. There is a high availability of military surplus ammo which makes the round very affordable.  Plus check out its bullet size vs the 5.56 coming up next… 5.56 vs 7.62x39mm For more info: Best 7.62×39 Ammo Best AK-47s .223 / 5.56x45mm 5.56 Round The “two-two-three” (inch) Remington has almost the exact dimensions as the “five-five-six” (mm) NATO cartridge. The 5.56 has higher pressures than the .223, so .223 rounds can be fired in a 5.56 rifle, while 5.56 rounds should not be fired in a .223 rifle. Deconstructed 5.56 XM855 Round Bullets are around 55 grains and the cartridge has light recoil. Assorted 5.56 Rounds (XM193, XM855, Gold Medal 69gr) It is the ammunition used in the M16/M4/AR-15 line of rifles and there’s still endless debate on its effectiveness in combat. For more info: Best .223/5.56 Ammo Best AR-15 .308 / 7.62x51mm The “three-oh-eight” (inch) Winchester is almost the same dimensions as the “seven-six-two” (mm) NATO round. 7.62x51mm There are special considerations when mixing the rounds but unless you know what you are doing, stick with the round intended for your rifle. It is a popular hunting round with moderate recoil, high stopping power, and a wide range of bullets available from 150 to 208 grains. Plus…one of the most popular heavier caliber machine gun and sniper rounds for many militaries around the world. Assorted 7.62x51mm (MEN 147gr, PPU 165gr, PPU 180gr, Gold Medal 168gr For more info: Best .308/7.62×51 Ammo Best .308 Battle Rifles Best AR-10s (.308) .50 BMG Not really common for civilians, but I just had to have it in here. .50 BMG It’s huge and has huge recoil with awesome range (confirmed kills at 2000m+), and you definitely don’t want to be on the receiving end of the bullet.  660 grains of pure stopping power. Common Calibers in Room This Barrett was OK because I was standing and it had a suppressor! Still with me? Common Bullet Types & Terminology Full Metal Jacket (FMJ) This is the most common type of bullet and consists of a soft metal core, such as lead fully encapsulated by a harder metal, such as copper. FMJ vs Hollowpoints (9mm and .45 ACP) They are usually pointy, round, or even flat.  Wound channels are typically small and go through a target. Great for the range but not preferred for defensive rounds. Hollow Point (HP) Hollow points are made to expand once they hit something.  They are the go-to round for police officers, concealed weapon carriers, and home defense guns because of their stopping power. 9mm "147 Federal Hydrashok" HST Open Tip (OTM) Open-tip bullets look like hollow points since they have an opening at the top, but this is more because of their manufacturing process.  The openings are too small to expand effectively. "Different Bullet Tips" (L TO R: FMJ, Soft, Open, Ballistic) Regular FMJ’s are created from small copper cups where the bottom of the cup becomes the tip of the bullet.  Open-tip bullets are the opposite, with the bottom of the cup becoming the bottom of the bullet. Open-tip bullets are sometimes also known as Open Tip Match (OTM) since they are preferred by long-distance shooters.  The manufacturing process for open tip bullets creates a more consistent round than FMJ.  Important when you’re shooting hundreds of yards! Ballistic Tip This is what you get when you combine the aerodynamics of an FMJ with the stopping power of a hollow point.  This is a hollow point covered with (usually red) plastic to mimic the profile of an FMJ. They are mostly used in hunting or precision shooting. Assorted 6.5 Creedmoor (L to R: Federal FMJ, Soft 129gr, Ballistic Tip 120gr, Gold Medal 140gr) Below you’ll see that the bottoms of the bullets are more streamlined.  This design is called “boat tail” and produces less drag as the bullet flies through the air.  HPBT is short for “hollow point boat tail.” .308 (168gr vs 208gr) Boat Tail Bullets Soft Point This is an earlier attempt to get the ballistic advantages of an FMJ with better expansion. Assorted 7.62×39 (FMJ, Open, Soft , FMJ) In soft point bullets, part of the lead is exposed at the tip.  The softer lead is designed to flatten better when the bullet hits a target.  But for the most part, ballistic tips have surpassed the performance of soft points. Shotguns The most popular sized shotgun round is the 12 gauge. Types of 12ga Shotgun Shells (L to R: Bird, Buck, Slug) Recoil can vary from moderate to high based on round. Shotgun ammunition is the most versatile with three main types of loads. "12ga Shotgun Shells" , Opened (L to R: Bird, Buck, Slug) Bird Shot Shot Size Chart, Shotgunworld Birdshot consists of the top row and is pretty small pellets numbering in the dozens in each shell. 12ga Birdshot, Opened Great for hunting birds and blasting clay pigeons, but not the best for home defense. Ok recoil. Buck Shot The overall best home defense round is buckshot.  00 (“double-aught”) is the go-to load. 12ga 00 Buckshot, Opened It’s 9 solid lead balls the same diameter as the 9mm handgun bullet. Much more recoil usually…but you can also find reduced-recoil buckshot rounds too. Slugs Slugs are single projectiles that are around 1 oz of solid metal that really bring the hurt. 12ga Slug, Opened However, they don’t have the spread of birdshot or buckshot.  But, in the hands of a solid shooter, they can be accurate up to 100 yards. 12ga Slugs For more info: Best Shotgun Ammo Best Tactical Home Defense Shotguns Best Semi-Auto Shotguns Components of Common Cartridges What makes up a cartridge? Here are just a couple breakdowns of super popular calibers.  You can see the difference in powders & bullets for each type. Deconstructed 9mm Round Deconstructed 5.56 XM855 Round Deconstructed 7.62×51 Round Conclusion There you have it…now you’re a bullet pro! Continue on with a deeper dive into Popular Handgun Calibers and Popular Rifle Calibers …or head on over to see where to buy some Ammo Online . And if an expertly created beginner handgun course is what you’re looking for…check out Gun Noob to Gun Slinger .

A Gun Collectors Regrets of Purchases Not Made

A Gun Collectors Regrets of Purchases Not Made

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d2fa14b8_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d2fa14b8_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Nothing is as bitter as lost opportunities when it comes to buying that special firearm. Regrets, unfortunately, are part of life, and just like grey hair, the longer we live the more we have. We linger too long over an opportunity or situation until it slips away, never to return. No matter the level of our success in life, we all have a few regrets about something. As a firearms enthusiast and gun collector, many of my most painful regrets are about those guns I didn’t, for one reason or another, purchase. Perhaps it’s nostalgia, but those guns are the ones I dream about more than the ones I have, and for many, I still wish I owned them today. The Auto-5 Like so many hunters I’ve spent much of my life searching for the perfect waterfowl gun that would transform my mediocre wingshooting into something worthy of Bogardus or Kimble. The Browning Auto 5 was once dubbed the Aristocrat of Shotguns and is arguably the finest duck gun ever manufactured. I almost owned one once—almost. I called the fellow who advertised it in the local paper one spring evening. We dickered and dodged on the phone for over an hour until I agreed to come see the gun. It turned out to be a 1950s full-choke Standard Model. What can I say about the Auto-5 that hasn't been said a million times? Related GunDigest Articles Gun Digest's Top 10 Gun Collecting Articles Photo Gallery: 14 Amazing Engraved Guns of Gun Digest 2015 Photo Gallery: Engraved and Custom Guns of Gun Digest 2016 I wanted the gun badly except for one nagging point: The 2¾-inch chamber seemed old fashioned, and at the time, the mantra of more pellets equaled more ducks ruled. A silly point I realize in hindsight, but it made me drive off that night without the Auto-5 in hand. The old fellow called me a week later to let me know the gun was gone, and I told him thanks for letting me know. I have regretted not buying that Auto-5 many, many times since that call. The Deer Rifle One frosty December morning, a neighbor flagged me down as I was driving a snowy county road. As we talked, he mentioned he was thinking of selling his deer rifle. Since I was “keen on guns,” as he put it, he asked if I knew of anyone looking for a Winchester? He’d bought the Model 94 carbine new, right after returning from Korea, and had carried it ever since. He hauled the rifle out from behind the truck seat and the plain Jane .30 WCF had plenty of honest wear on it silvery frame. We talked about the rifle and he told me about cold November hunts with long dead companions. As we talked he handled the Winchester, and I remember thinking I sure wouldn’t want to be a buck in his sights. But in those days all my heroes carried scoped bolt actions in .270, and I just couldn’t see myself with some old relic. I told him I’d ask around. It was decades later that I realized he wanted me to buy it. That well used .30 WCF is long gone now and so is the hunter, but I should have been wiser. I should have bought the gift he offered of gun and memories. A “Modern” Sporting Rifle Today, every firearms company builds a version of the “black rifle,” but once there was only one choice for the average shooting enthusiast: the Colt AR-15. Period. When an AR-15 appeared in the local gun shop in the early '70s it certainly sparked some attention, for about 10 minutes. The Colt was handled plenty but always returned to the rack. No one seemed interested, and the gun dealer marked it down in desperation to get it off the rack. I asked to handle it several times and marveled at the natural pointing qualities, light weight and quick sighting. It came with a five-round magazine, and the dealer told me a scope was available. I began to seriously consider it after talking to a fellow who’d carried one in Southeast Asia a few years earlier. But after I showed my Dad, I decided to listen to my elder and the AR-15 slipped away to a far-sighted hunter in the next county. Nowadays choices abound since sportsman finally learned the platform is excellent for hunting or shooting. It sure would have been nice to have that original Colt rifle, but like so many other guns, it is only a memory and a regrettable one at that.

GripSense Activation Technology Grabs Consumers

GripSense Activation Technology Grabs Consumers

The new activation technology from LaserMax is coined GripSense™ and offers users dual activation choices via instant on with capacitive touch or button controlled activation. “Offering consumers the ability to choose between modes of button activation or GripSense activation is really incredible” said Chris Tinkle, Chief Sales Officer for LaserMax. “Our GripSense Technology is a safe and tactically sound instant on capability that consumers have desired for years, while still providing the ability to have controlled activation.” The Patent Pending GripSense Technology utilizes similar capacitive sensing technology to smartphones, in that the product contains a detection zone in the area that users middle finger indexes the trigger guard of the firearm and senses the user’s grip on the firearm and activates the light or laser instantly.  The user has the option to turn off the light or laser with the push of a button or disable the GripSense Activation and rely solely on the button activation. “I am very proud of our team and excited to see the market’s reaction to our new GripSense Technology,” said Chris Tinkle. He added, “Our team has been very careful to work on an ‘instant on’ solution for laser aiming devices. We challenged our Engineering team to develop a solution that met customer demand while ensuring that the product doesn’t comprise proper doctrinal use of laser aiming devices in law enforcement or self-defense use cases.  Our team delivered an incredible solution in GripSense Technology.” About LaserMax Now in its 26th year, LaserMax is a leading innovator and designer of premium laser aiming systems with a growing portfolio of significant patents. Specializing in the design and manufacture of rugged and innovative firearm sighting solutions for military, law enforcement and commercial markets worldwide. The company also delivers premium laser products and optical systems for the semiconductor, aerospace, biomedical and telecommunications industries. LaserMax is an ISO 9001:2008 certified and WOSB 8(m) certified Women-Owned Small Business and has been recognized by Inc. 500|5000 as one of the fastest growing companies in the U.S.

The Ultimate Guide to Lucid-HD 7 Red Dot Sight 2020

The Ultimate Guide to Lucid-HD 7 Red Dot Sight  2020

For a very long time the optics industry basically produced two kinds of optics. The poorly made and the close to unaffordable. Without a doubt you could get an ‘affordable’ scope, but how long would it last under pressure? You could also get a quality scope …but be prepared to pay for it. There wasn’t a good middle ground for those looking for a decent scope, at a good price. It wasn’t until the last 5 or so years we’ve really seen quality optics at a good price make an appearance. The Lucid HD7 was one of the first scopes to hit the market at a price most could afford and offered an excellent degree of quality. Priced with an MSRP of 250 dollars the Lucid HD7 occupied an interesting space when it was first unveiled. Now that we are well into the third generation of Lucid HD7 and the price hasn’t changed, and neither has the unwavering commitment to quality. The Lucid HD 7 has been beaten, abused, kicked, and killed as it grew from Gen 1 to 2, and now 3. It’s only gotten better. Lucid seems dedicated to making sure the HD 7 is a tool you can depend on with your life. To test the first Gen, they tossed them out of planes with paratroopers, and only 1 failed. They still saw that failure and made improvements. I didn’t jump out of a plane with it, but I did take the Lucid HD 7 for a spin. @import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,700&subset=latin");@import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lato:300,700,400&subset=latin");@media (min-width: 300px){[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { border: none; background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; margin-top: 0px !important; padding: 0px !important; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; background-color: rgb(242, 237, 237) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { margin-top: -10px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 15px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { line-height: 1.1em !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-family: inherit !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; font-size: 17px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { line-height: 1em !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] strong { font-weight: 700; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-family: Lato; font-weight: 400; font-size: 25px !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { padding-top: 0px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; text-align: center; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 0px 0px 20px !important; background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-35bd34974a14d8"] { max-width: 760px; min-height: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] > .tcb-flex-col { padding-left: 0px; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { border: none; border-radius: 5px; overflow: hidden; padding: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 20px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-85bd34974a1604"] { width: 85px; float: none; margin: 0px auto !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] { color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; font-size: 16px !important; font-family: "Open Sans" !important; letter-spacing: 1px; font-weight: 400 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-135bd34974a173a"] { overflow: hidden; max-width: 330px; float: none; width: 100%; background-color: rgb(241, 89, 42) !important; border-radius: 5px !important; padding-top: 5px !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; margin-left: auto !important; margin-right: auto !important; z-index: 3; position: relative; }[data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] .tve-page-section-in { display: block; }}@media (max-width: 767px){[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { text-align: center; background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-size: 22px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-size: 28px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { background-image: none !important; padding-top: 10px !important; padding-bottom: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { padding-top: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { padding-bottom: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; padding-left: 10px !important; padding-right: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 10px 0px !important; background-image: none !important; }} .tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h3{margin:0;padding:0}.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element p,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h3{margin:0} Get Deals on Guns and Tactical Gear Join 70,000 Readers For Our Weekly Discounts ​ GET MY DISCOUNTS Table of Contents 1 Optic Specs 2 The Pre Shoot Setup 3 Testing it at 7, 15, and 25 yards 4 Backing Off to 100 Yards Optic Specs Before we dive into performance lets talk a bit about what the Lucid is. The Lucid HD 7 is a red dot optic that lacks any magnification this optic is made for shots at arnage from the end of the barrel to about 200 yards. You can get further with a magnifier, and some skill. The HD 7 has 4 different reticles . I enjoy each of them and find each useful in their own way. However, in my testing I tend to prefer reticle Number 1. The reticles included are the following: Small dot inside large circle Chevron Reticle with T shaped drop compensator Cross hair with mil dot drop compensation Single Red Dot I’ll go into why I prefer the Number 1 reticle a bit more later. Let’s take a peek at the numbers and you’ll get a better idea of the HD 7’s overall size. Length – 5.5 inches Weight – 13 ounces Cowtiness? – Yes, Lower 1/3rd Objective Lens – 34 mm The "Pre Shoot Setup" Before we dive into shooting with Lucid HD 7 let’s talk a bit about first impressions. Once we get to the range we get a bit more concerned with putting lead downrange than we do things like optical clarity. The HD 7 runs on a single AAA battery and the system has 7 different brightness levels. These range from a whisper of red light, to oh that kind of burns the eye. The Lucid has an impressive auto brightness sensor that I loved toying with. It gave me a grin to look through the optic and turn a light on and off. The reticle adjusted quickly and purposefully. Even taking it from room to room at different light levels impressed me. The reticle decreased and more importantly increased in brightness almost instantly. Manual adjustments could still be made and set if you prefer to rock one setting and no more. I was surprised and impressed with the auto brightness sensor that I just let it do its thing. Mounting to an optic is easy since the Lucid comes with a single piece built in picatinny rail mount. It’s simple, and effective. It mounts with ease and has remained secure. Optical clarity wise for a 250ish dollar optic I was pleasantly surprised when I looked through the optic. The image is crisp and clear, even around the edges there is no noticeable distortion. The large 34mm objective lens is certainly being put to use. The controls for turning the optic on and adjusting the brightness levels are on the left side so right handed shooters can make adjustments without releasing their firing hand. Lefties may not be a big fan, but it worked for me. Reaching the adjustments was simple and easy. There is also a two hour auto off feature. Which is great because I leave my optics on all the time. I blame on using ACOGs for so long you just kinda forget about batteries. The auto shut off according to the manual is two hours of no activity. The auto adjusting must count as two hours because I certainly used it on the range for more than two hours without it shutting off. Funny story is I don’t often read the depths of manuals, being a professional gun writer and all I think I know everything. I just left it on, and the next morning it was off. So, I investigated and sure enough the auto off feature works. Testing it at 7, 15, and 25 yards Finally, we make it to the range. Step one was a quick 25 yard zero. Something simple and easy to do with the Lucid. It ½ MOA adjustments will move you left, right, up, and down quickly. I simply fired three round groups, measured my MOA 100 yard target and made adjustments as necessary. Once I was zeroed I cycled through the different reticles and experimented. For a nonmagnified optic the circle and dot, or just the dot make the most sense. Lucid makes a 5x magnifier , but I didn’t have one. With 1x I’m not at a range where I’m worrying about ballistic drop. That discounted two reticles for me. At these close ranges the circle and dot seemed to make a lot of sense to me. Close range gunfighting is all about speed and accuracy . You want to get your gun on target, and you want to put holes in that target as rapidly as possible. The circle and dot gives me a bigger reticle overall , the large circle is easier to pick up with my eye, and quicker as well. This gives it an advantage over just the dot. At these close ranges I just used that big circle. My theory was simply, fill the circle with my target and start pulling the trigger. It worked, and it worked really well, especially for bad breath distances. That big circle catches my eye and I can put rounds on target quick, fast, and in a hurry. Another careful consideration is going to be transition speeds. Transitioning between targets is one of the primary advantages of a red dot over iron sights. It’s simply faster. The fatal flaw with red dots is blur. Blur is going to occur no matter what, but if the optic’s glass is clear the recovery will be much quicker. With blurriness around the edges the blur will be harder to recover from. I mentioned earlier the glass was crystal clear so my problems with blur weren’t problems at all. I could transition between multiple targets with ease and put round after round at each target. Even complicated drills like the failure to stop on two targets wasn’t an issue. That drill has to switching targets 4 times total, so it really stresses proper transitions. Finding the small target known as the head is easy and rapid. Again, at even 25 yards the head of my targets fit perfectly into my big circle. Put head in circle, pull trigger end the fight. Backing Off to 100 Yards Once I hit the hundred yard line I reconfirmed my hasty zero and was satisfied with the results. From here I got off paper targets because I didn’t want to check group sizes and confirm hits visually. Instead I moved to some steel gongs. Audible confirmation is so much more satisfying. Taking up a solid prone position I made the gong, and ring it dead. Nearly as fast as I could pull the trigger I could keep it singing. 100 yards isn’t much of a challenge in the prone. I moved to standing, kneeling, and worked some barricades. I used the same circle, but now I’m aiming with the lit dot inside the big circle. Being precise with the Lucid was easy and even if the standing and kneeling positions I had little trouble making the gongs sing. Overall the Lucid HD 7 impressed the hell out of me . In close quarters, and more extended ranges I had zero issues hitting my targets. I found the optic easy to use and even after hours at the range I can’t find much to complain about. I’d easily trust the Lucid HD 7 as a home defense optic , especially after seeing its close-range performance. It’s crystal clear optics make it perfect for ranges out to 200 yards, and the addition of a magnifier can pull you out either further. The Lucid isn’t the fanciest scope, but it excels at the basics of riflery, and we can’t ask for much more than that at its price range. Related Reads: Best Red Dots For Ar-15 Rifles Red Dot Pistol Sights Bushnell TRS-25 Red Dot Mid-range Red-dot Scope Dagger Defense Red Dot Sights Ultra Shot Red Dot Sight Red Dot Bang 5/5 (1 Review) Will Ellis Hi there, I'm Will and I'll be your guide. Here at Gun News Daily, we support guns for self defense and and competitive shooting. We believe that America should be free and support the 2nd Amendment. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply

The 4 Best Scopes for Scar 17 – Optic Reviews 2020 Photo by Keary O. / CC BY The Scar 17 is one of the most modern, heavy hitting battle rifles out there. Designed by FN and marketed to the Special Operation community, the SCAR 17 has the ergonomics of an assault rifle but with the powerful .308 chambering. Because the Scar 17 is a precise rifle, it needs a good quality optic to take advantage of its max range. The 7.62 NATO/ .308 Winchester round is a heavyweight quite unlike the dainty 5.56mm. This means any optic topping the Scar 17 needs to be strong and resistant to recoil. A good optic needs to compliment the Scar and take advantage of its seamless ability to transition from a designated marksman rifle to a hard hitting close-quarters battle weapon. Here, in our humble opinion, are the 4 best Scopes for Scar 17 rifles: Trijicon ACOG BR .308 Trijicon TA11J-308 ACOG 3.5x35mm Dual Illuminatedx 40mm, Red Crosshair .308 Ballistic Reticle with TA51 Mount, Black Price: Price as of 08/14/2020 15:45 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. If money were no object, this is the best scope for Scar 17 period. The Trijicon ACOG is well known for its military use on standard M4 and M16 rifles. However, these rifles are chambered in the 5.56mm, and the reticle and bullet drop compensator is ineffective on the .308 round. A Scar 17 needs the ACOG BR .308 (the BR stands for ballistic reticle). This ACOG by Trijicon is specifically tailored for the .308 round and takes bullet drop into account. This is in the form of a BDC that shows the user where the exact holdover is for certain ranges. The Trijicon ACOG ( see full specs ) has a 3.5x level of magnification and a 35mm objective lens. The model comes with either a green or red reticle that is illuminated but completely battery free. The scope uses a combination of tritium and fiber optics to absorb light and provide internal illumination. The optic is nearly a pound and 8 inches in length so it’s no slouch in the size department. However, the Trijicon ACOG optics are known for their last lasting durability and bulletproof strength. The ACOG brand has proven itself through two wars and a decade of experience. This is an optic even a Marine can’t break. The Trijicon ACOG compliments a Scar 17 very well and allows the rifle to act as both a close quarters and ranged battle rifle. Rock River LAR 8 - 300 yd steel - Trijicon ACOG (TA11J-308) Watch this video on YouTube

A Riflemans Guide to the ACOG

The ACOG is a time tested optic… however it is getting rapidly displaced by the LPVO in civilian and military circles. This is a guide to share some of the advantages and disadvantages of the ACOG sighting system and compare it to the typical LPVO. Both the LPVO and ACOG are excellent tools for the rifleman, each with its unique advantages and disadvantages. I am going to highlight some thoughts on the ACOG as it relates to a rifleman trying to decide if the ACOG offers him or her anything over the LPVO. This guide will break down a few reasons why the ACOG is still pertinent, and then discuss the advantages (and some disadvantages) for the rifleman the ACOG can provide. Let’s get started! Weight: ACOG’s are lightweight. The compact prismatic design and simple construction lead to a compact, lightweight optic. My Ta01 weighs 9 oz and with mount, it runs a portly 14 oz. A Burris RT-6 weighs in at 17.4 oz without the mount. When you add the once piece mount you are adding about 5 more oz to the setup so at a bare minimum you are going to push 20+ oz. To be fair, a variable does allow us to go down to 1x so we need to add an RMR into the equation to give the ACOG the same capability. So let’s add 2.8 oz for the RMR and mount. That brings us to 16.8 oz for a 1x / 4x optic with the mount to compare with a Burris RT-6 which pushes 20 oz with mount. At least. Simple. Lightweight. Rugged. The ACOG is a great choice for weight-conscious shooters, especially for shooters running 20-inch cannons. I ran a RAZOR HDII on my 20-inch gun for fun once… and I took it off immediately. The extra weight of a variable is a nicer pairing with a lighter carbine. If weight is a consideration, the rifleman can obtain a robust, lightweight optic that allows him/her to reach out and connect out to 600 yards without the weight penalty of variables and traditional optics. Low Light Shooting: Look Ma! No Batteries! The larger objective lens of the ACOG comes in handy during dim light conditions.  When the human eye has had around 20 minutes of dim lighting conditions, the pupil will expand up to 7-8mm to send as much light as possible to the retina. The ACOG’s 32mm objective lens funnels a comparatively large amount of ambient light down to an 8mm exit pupil which matches the pupil diameter the night-adapted eye. The typical 24 mm objective of a variable has much less light-gathering capability in comparison… and it won’t be as efficient until around 3x magnification. The ACOG has a 33 percent larger objective than a typical 24mm variable. The tritium comes into play as well. Many shooters scoff at the cost and effort to send the optic every 15 years for a recharge… meanwhile the variable needs a fresh 2032 and it’s ready to go. This is true… there have been quotes from Trijicon for 500 dollars for a recharge, but this typically involves new seals, tritium, inspection, and amounts to an oil change for your optic. I have heard that they will drop in new reticles if requested during this procedure! I certainly don’t mind the full reticle illumination of my TA01. Many variables can illuminate their entire reticle, but at the cost of light spillage out the front of the optic. Trying to hide in the dark? Better keep that reticle on low. Light Bleed from an illuminated variable optic So as a whole, the ACOG will outclass variables in lower light conditions. While some variables have great light transmission and reticles which don’t flood out the front of the optic (such as the Razor HD) they still can’t match the larger objective lens of the ACOG 4x and 3.5x series of optics. To take advantage of the enhanced light transmission, variables must also be set to a magnification that matches the diameter of the night-adapted eye. This is another step that needs to be taken to enhance dim light shooting that the ACOG user needs not to worry about. The perceived brightness of a variable depends on the magnification setting of the optic. At 1x there will be no perceived brightness enhancement. The image on an MTAC will be brightest at 3.4x zoom. A large objective isn’t night vision, but it’s likely as close as you can get with the naked eye. The 4x ACOG (in orange) offers a perceived 3x brightness enhancement over its peers. Hit Percentage: What do we give up to 6x-10x? The next point of discussion is the hit percentage. Does the ACOG limit shooters with its 4X magnification? What does it give up to variables? It does give up a little, but overall the 4x magnification doesn’t limit the shooter as much as you would think… at least with the data we have available. “Effects of Sight Type, Zero Methodology, and Target Distance on Shooting Performance Measures While Controlling for Ammunition Velocity and Individual Experience” As the above figure above shows, the ACOG (m150) trends closely with the Razor 1-6 until 400 meters. With the additional magnification a variable provides, I am sure it explains the hit percentage improvement. At 300 yards the shooters managed to score about evenly with the Razor HD and ACOG… within the margin of error. The blue line, representing iron sights, is substantially lower in hit probability. Past the studies 400 yards, I am sure the 4x will limit the ACOGs hit percentage as range increases. Balance this with your perceived needs. Weight vs more magnification is the real hand at play here. So while weight, low light performance, and robust housing are in the ACOG’s favor, there are some downsides. Let’s take a gander at some of the big ones that often come up in online discussion. ACOG’s are Pricey: The elephant in the room is the cost of the ACOG. Starting at $900 for a basic TA01, it takes a huge financial leap to grab an ACOG for most shooters. If you own an ACOG or variable over 600 dollars than you are a shooting enthusiast. Flat out, the general public has no interest in spending anywhere near that much money on a rifle optic. To compare costs, we need to set a bar for what is an equivalent product in the variable market. Razor HD IIs come to mind as they are comparable in price, durability, and feature a daylight bright reticle. To hash out which is better requires a careful weighing of shooter priorities. Weight. Durability. Enhanced target fidelity. FOV. It’s going to amount to rifleman’s preference as high-end variables and ACOG’s are both excellent sighting systems. So I would count this as a wash. If you’re in the market for a $1000 optic, you can weigh your decision based on your use case. 99 percent of gun owners are not in the market for a 1000 dollar optic. ACOG’s BAC is WONKY: The Bindon Aiming Concept is a well-known method of “snap shooting” with the ACOG. It’s just hard to explain to shooters. It’s also nowhere near as precise as a 1X variable. I played with BAC and found it to be suitable for close range, across the room shooting. My hits were solid and it wasn’t hard… but you need experience behind the gun to rapidly mount the rifle and rapidly peer through the ACOG. Good muscle memory and good presentation of the rifle are essential to use BAC effectively. Upon mounting, the bright reticle of the dual illuminated ACOG appears as a streak on the target. The shooter must then fire before the brain takes over the brighter, clearer, 4x image. It requires practice and speed. It is not as duh intuitive as a 1x Variable. The above diagram is as best as I can relay how things look when using BAC. In real life, in bright light, the reticle appears nuclear bright so that aspect of the photo is misleading. The brain wants to “focus” on the bright, crisp ACOG sight picture while the other eye focuses on the target. If you delay then you will mentally focus on the 4x image and this isn’t ideal. Snap fire upon seeing the reticle on target is the proper order to use BAC. However, it is 2020. We mount RMR’s on everything. The BAC feature became less important as we can now mount a 1x optic piggybacked on the ACOG. Is this as desirable as 1x on a variable? Not really, but it does allow the shooter both a backup sight should the ACOG fail and can be used for snap fire with less drama than BAC. On a side note, anyone notice that even Razor HD IIs are getting RMR mount rings? “Yo Dog I heard you like 1x optics for yo 1x optic so I got you this mount that lets you 1x your 1x.” Reptilla RMR Mount The above setup has had some positive feedback from hardcore shooters so there is still merit to a 1x optic high overbore… even when you can yank your variable down to 1x. Passive night vision use comes to mind. FUTURE READY. So BAC is wonky, but for additional funds, you can work around the poor performance of BAC and grab an RMR for up-close shooting. But MUH Eye Relief ! This is a “problem” on 4x models as they have the worst eye relief of the Trijicon ACOG lineup. As a hardcore iron sight shooter, I have no problem getting behind the glass of an ACOG. Proper mounting of the ACOG is essential. Adjustable stocks help alleviate eye relief issues as the ACOG can be mounted mid-way down the receiver and the stock can then be adjusted to make the rifleman comfortable behind the gun. Many new ACOG owners mount the ACOG at the rear of the upper receiver to obtain comfortable eye relief, but the solution is getting the gun setup where rifle ergonomics match the shooter. A2 stock owners notwithstanding… not much you can do there. So while the short eye-relief is an often-discussed issue, I have never had a problem with 4x ACOGs. A properly set up rifle will allow comfortable shooting from all positions with the 4x ACOG. Muscle memory, proper rifle setup, and solid shooting fundamentals will negate the eye-relief issues. Wrapping Up Until Part 2: Wew that’s kinda a long article. So we have discussed some of the advantages and disadvantages of the ACOG. It’s a lightweight, robust optic that can go toe to toe with modern variables provided you can weigh the advantages and disadvantages. I will be writing part 2 to cover ACOG models, reticle choices, loadings, and parallax errors with the ACOG. It’s gonna be fun, so expect a drop as my next big article. Until then, look for more stuff from Richard and Damien! MAH FAVORITE ACOG PICTURE. I MADE DIS. LOTHAEN OUT. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Summary

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s One of the most daunting things when I first started looking for a gun was… what size bullet to get? Popular Pistol Calibers Things got even crazier when I started to look at rifles… Common Rifle Calibers But don’t worry…we’ll be covering some of the most popular handgun, rifle, and shotgun calibers out there. As well as the benefits and weaknesses of each. Then we’ll follow up with some bullet terminology and the different types of bullet tips (hollow point, etc), how shotgun shell sizes work, and a breakdown of the components of a round.